Lamenting for change

R240,00

A liturgical and sermon series intentionally developed for Lent, for use in congregations in South Africa

Lament nurtures realistic hope in us, hope that rests in the reality of the victory of the crucified Christ. Lament nurtures resilient hope, hope that waits courageously and with gratitude upon the Lord, enduring and elastic hope that says we can be stressed and stretched, but we shall not be broken – Nico Koopman.

The people of South Africa should acquire a change of tongue, as Antjie Krog wrote two decades ago. It is indeed time that we start speaking a new language, and for Christians this language is the language of hope.

Lamenting is a language and praxis of hope. As a country we need to lament for change, and this book wants to serve that need. We believe that God uses acts of lament – practices that embody agony but are addressed to God – to move people from apathy to energy. Both those who are lamenting and those who hear the lament can, through the lament, be connected to the liturgy of life in current-day South Africa.

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Description

SUBTITLE: Worship and preaching for social impact, Resources for a season of lament in service of hope

FORMAT: Book

PAGES: 200

SUMMARY: A liturgical and sermon series intentionally developed for Lent, for use in congregations in South Africa

Lament nurtures realistic hope in us, hope that rests in the reality of the victory of the crucified Christ. Lament nurtures resilient hope, hope that waits courageously and with gratitude upon the Lord, enduring and elastic hope that says we can be stressed and stretched, but we shall not be broken – Nico Koopman.

The people of South Africa should acquire a change of tongue, as Antjie Krog wrote two decades ago. It is indeed time that we start speaking a new language, and for Christians this language is the language of hope.

Lamenting is a language and praxis of hope. As a country we need to lament for change, and this book wants to serve that need. We believe that God uses acts of lament – practices that embody agony but are addressed to God – to move people from apathy to energy. Both those who are lamenting and those who hear the lament can, through the lament, be connected to the liturgy of life in current-day South Africa.

CONTENT:

Foreword by Nico Koopman

Prologue: Rachel weeping in Rama – Cas Wepener

  1. Blessed are those who lament: Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5–7) – Marius Nel
  2. Totally disillusioned? (Lamentations 1:1-22) – Louis Jonker
  3. What are we to do when God seems angry, absent or silent in the face of our pain and suffering? (Psalm 74) – Peter Langerman
  4. Drowning bodies: Lamenting with Jonah (Jonah 2) – Juliana Claassens
  5. When living in discomfort: Remember! (Hebrews 10:32-39) – Christo Thesnaar
  6. Living in challenging times, and becoming partners in powerlessness and power (Mark 6:1-13 and Matthew 13:31-33, 44-52) – Dion Forster
  7. Killing me softly … the violence of silence (2 Samuel 13:1-22) – Dawid Mouton
  8. The triumph of tears (Genesis 21:8-21) – Johan Cilliers
  9. Lamenting the loss of sons and daughters (Matthew 2:13-23 and Jeremiah 31) – Lisel Joubert
  10. “No!” A case for the holiness of “no” in confronting society’s bullies (Esther 1) – Marileen Steyn
  11. Jephthah’s daughter and thousands of South Africa’s daughters (Judges 11) – Cas Wepener
  12. A ritual disruption (and a silent sermon) – Cas Wepener and Marileen Steyn
  13. “Whose ministry is it anyway?” (Mark 9:30-50) – Shantelle Weber
  14. The Sabbath as a sign of harmony with God and creation amidst climate change (Exodus 20:8-12) – Ian Nell

Epilogue: Jesus appears amidst the tears – Dawid Mouton

EDITORS: Prof Cas Wepener, an ordained minister in the Dutch Reformed Church, teaches Liturgy and Homiletics at Stellenbosch University.

Dr Dawid Mouton, an ordained minister in the Uniting Reformed Church of Southern Africa, teaches Pastoral Care and Counselling at Stellenbosch University.

Contributors: Marius Nel, Louis Jonker, Peter Langerman, Juliana Claassens, Christo Thesnaar, Dion Forster, Johan Cilliers, Lisel Joubert, Marileen Steyn, Shantelle Weber and Ian Nell.