Dancing with Deity (e-Book)

R141.23

This publication explores the role of art in religious experience, especially in reformed liturgy. The author subscribes to the view that aesthetics in theology is important.

His main thesis is that faith is Spirit and imagination, revelation and creativity. God has a face, his goal is a new heaven and a new earth, and therefore whoever believes cannot do without images, without imagination. Cilliers writes in the belief that worship, whether done individually or communally, is indeed beautiful. According to the Catechism of Westminster, it is the vocation of all human beings to know and enjoy God forever. Worship is and should be a beautiful experience, even and perhaps especially in the midst of a world that seems to be falling apart. Worship is to dance about.

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SKU: 9780864875907 Category:

Description

SUBTITLE: Re-imaging the beauty of worship

FORMAT: Electronic book in the ePub format

PAGES: 254 in the case of the softcover

SUMMARY: This publication explores the role of art in religious experience, especially in reformed liturgy. The author subscribes to the view that aesthetics in theology is important. His main thesis is that faith is Spirit and imagination, revelation and creativity. God has a face, his goal is a new heaven and a new earth, and therefore whoever believes cannot do without images, without imagination.

Cilliers writes in the belief that worship, whether done individually or communally, is indeed beautiful. According to the Catechism of Westminster, it is the vocation of all human beings to know and enjoy God forever. Worship is and should be a beautiful experience, even and perhaps especially in the midst of a world that seems to be falling apart. Worship is to dance about

CONTENTS

Preface Prologue

Chapter 1: Art and religion: Graceful dance partners?
1.1 Three phases
1.2 Three hinges
1.3 Four faces

Chapter 2: A rediscovery of aesthetics?
2.1 Recent developments
2.2 Clarification of concepts
2.2.1 Definitions of aesthetics
2.2.2 Definitions of art

2.3 Aesthetics and art within a practical theological framework
2.3.1 Practical theological paradigm shifts: from theory to techné to theopathy
2.3.2 Aesthetical theology as locus theologicus?
2.3.2.1 Aesthetical theology as expression of beauty
2.3.2.2 Aesthetical theology as creative imagination
2.3.2.3 Aesthetical theology as generation of meaning

2.4 The beauty of imagined meaning: profiling practical theological aesthetics

Chapter 3: Why aesthetics is important for liturgy
3.1 The inescapability of aesthetical expression

3.2 The rediscovery of our corporality
3.2.1 Embodiment: liturgical implications
3.2.1.1 Liturgical embodiment as immediate participation
3.2.1.2 Liturgical embodiment as multi-sensory, interpretative act
3.2.1.3 Liturgical embodiment as broken presence and celebrated absence

3.3 The upsurge of a culture of images
3.3.1 Kitsch: simulation of beauty, goodness and truth?
3.3.2 Liturgy and the lure of kitsch
3.3.2.1 Kitsch as simulated “beauty”
3.3.2.2 Kitsch as simulated “goodness”
3.3.2.3 Kitsch as simulated “truth”
3.3.3 Characteristics of kitsch?

3.4 The neuro-cognitive integration of imagination
3.5 The Bible as Book of Images

Chapter 4: Towards an aesthetical definition of liturgy
4.1 Non-functional functionality?
4.2 Liturgical implications?
4.3 Dancing with Deity
4.4 Dancing the difference

4.5 The rhythms of liturgy
4.5.1 Religion and culture: the search for meaning
4.5.2 Music: the expression of life in sound
4.5.3 Faith that seeks sound (fides quaerens sonum)
4.5.4 Echoes of life

Chapter 5: Aesthetical movements in liturgical context
5.1 Movements of an aesthetical liturgy

5.2.1 The art of observation
5.2.1.1 The liturgical aesthetics of fasting

5.2.1.2 The liturgical aesthetics of feasting

5.2.2 The art of interpretation
5.2.2.1 The anti-aesthetical beauty of kenosis
5.2.2.2 Aesthetical translocation as self-critique
5.2.2.3 Liturgical aesthetics as koinonia
5.2.2.4 Liturgical aesthetics as sapientia

5.2.3 The art of anticipation
5.2.3.1 Metaphorical language as windows to the Unseen
5.2.3.2 Anticipatory signs of the presence of Absence
5.2.3.3 Liturgy in liminality
5.2.3.4 The aesthetics of silence

5.2.4 The art of transformation

5.2.4.1 Aesthetical leitourgia as diakonia
5.2.4.2 Guernica
5.2.4.2.1 Historical background
5.2.4.2.2 Cubistic symbolism
5.2.4.2.3 Public protest

5.2.4.3 Fides quaerens imaginem: the quest for liturgical reframing

5.2.4.4 The aesthetical dimension of reframing
5.2.4.4.1 Reframing as re-naming (or re-labelling
5.2.4.4.2. Reframing as re-figuring
5.2.4.4.3 Reframing as re-signification

5.2.4.5 Liturgical implications of reframing
5.2.4.5.1 Liturgical reframing as re-creatio
5.2.4.5.2 Liturgical reframing: not “more of the same”
5.2.4.5.3 Liturgical reframing as encounter with the “other”
5.2.4.5.4 Liturgical reframing as “wise foolishness”

Chapter 6: Last tango

Bibliography

AUTHOR

After completing his theological studies at the University of Stellenbosch, Johan Cilliers completed his doctoral thesis at the University of Heidelberg. After serving in two congregations Cilliers started teaching at the University of Stellenbosch where he is responsible for Homiletics and Liturgy in the Department of Pratical Theology, as important components within the broader framework of the communication of the Gospel.

On the one hand, he concentrates on the development of a sound theology for preaching and, on the other, on the empirical research and the evaluation of sermons. Johan Cilliers is the author of many articles and books. He likes to live out his artistic talent on canvas – many of his paintings are on display at the chapel of the Faculty of Theology, Stellenbosch University.